Rembrandt sketch long thought to be a copy upgraded to an original

In 1921, Dutch art historian and Rembrandt expert Abraham Bredius purchased an oil sketch of The Raising of the Cross, which he believed to be by Dutch Golden Age artist Rembrandt. The sketch entered the collection of the Bredius Museum in The Hague, but art experts have never taken the attribution to Rembrandt seriously, considering the work to be a mere copy, or a “crude imitation”, of a painting by the Dutch master.

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Rijksmuseum set to acquire €175 million Rembrandt painting

One of the few portraits by Rembrandt left in private hands is likely to be purchased by the Rijksmuseum with assistance from the Dutch government. The total price of the painting is €175 million ($198 million), with the Rembrandt Association contributing €15 million and the Rijksmuseum Fund providing €10 million. The Dutch Government is set to pay the remaining €150 million, although final approvement from parliament is yet to be granted.

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Possible Rembrandt returned forty years after it was stolen in East Germany

In 1979, five paintings were stolen from Schloss Friedenstein in Gotha, Germany. The works did not re-emerge for 40 years, and the event became communist East Germany’s biggest ever art heist. In 2019, however, the paintings were returned to Friedenstein, and new scientific analysis and research indicates that one of the portraits, previously attributed to seventeenth-century artist Ferdinand Bol, might be a lost masterpiece by Rembrandt.

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