Exhibitions

In London? We recommend…

 

Wear the Heat

Where: Sophia Contemporary Gallery, 11 Grosvenor Street, Mayfair, London, W1K 4QB
When: 27th June – 28th July 2018
Tickets: free entry

Sophia Contemporary Gallery opens its doors in just over a week to its newest exhibition, Wear the Heat by Veronica Brovall. It is the first solo exhibition of the Swedish artist to take place in the UK and features seven new glazed ceramic and steel sculptures created in 2018. Through the use of ceramics Brovall’s work explores themes of femininity, gender, sexuality and violence. The artworks evoke male and female anatomy with protruding limbs and others parts of the body trying to break out of the mould, all creating a visceral and somewhat violent effect representing primal human urges.

The use of ceramics create a raw and physical feel which is echoed throughout the artworks and lends itself aptly as the medium for such a subject matter. The artist challenges the typical role and perception of ceramics as being a predominantly female and domestic material. Brovall creates works with such power which negate any association with traditional femininity and crafts. The title of the exhibition Wear the Heat alludes to the creation of the artworks using a kiln where they are fired as well as metaphorically through the sexuality and eroticism conveyed by the sculptures. This is juxtaposed by the finished product of the sculptures which are cold to the touch in their final form.

Boodle Hatfield have enjoyed working with Sophia Contemporary on various private events over the last twelve months including a private party surrounded by Afruz Amighi’s ‘Echo’s Chamber’ installations, and a party to celebrate the launch of Mayfair Art Weekend’s ‘Gallery HOP!’ event in 2017. With an impressive calendar of events to look forward to, this is one of London’s galleries to watch.

 

Monet & Architecture

Where: The National Gallery, Trafalgar Square, London WC2N 5DN
When: 9th April – 29th July 2018
Tickets: £22, click here to book

On 9th April, the National Gallery opened its latest exhibition ‘Monet & Architecture’. Claude Monet, one of the most famous artists in the world, is typically known for his landscapes, seascapes and of course the famous water-lilies so this exhibition showcasing his more urban paintings may come as a surprise. However, the exhibition does not disappoint. With more than 75 of Monet’s paintings, the exhibition spans his long career as the viewer experiences his development of the Impressionist style through the depiction of architecture and buildings.

Monet was well travelled for the 19th century and his artwork undoubtedly reflects this. He created paintings of northern and southern France, northern Italy, including Venice and London. Monet’s cycle of paintings of Rouen Cathedral are among the highlights of the exhibition as Monet explores the effects of changing light and atmosphere upon the facade of the cathedral. Not only does the colouring vary in the 5 paintings shown, but there are also subtle changes in the composition. What appears at first glance to be exactly the same view is actually different as there are slight changes of viewpoint and focus. The series of London paintings is also particularly beautiful, giving a new and otherworldly perspective to what will be familiar views to many Londoners. In the last room of the exhibition hang 3 of Monet’s paintings of San Giorgio Maggiore, Venice, in which Monet has once again taken the same subject and varied the colours and effects used to create an evocative exploration of the relationship between buildings, water and air. Even though this exhibition is putting the iconic water-lilies and landscapes to one side it is well worth a visit to gain an understanding of the artist’s relationship with architecture and urban life.